Scalloped Hammerhead Juvenile (Sphyrna lewini)

  Scalloped Hammerhead Juvenile (Sphyrna lewini)

 

scalloped hammerhead juvenile, delaware, sussex county, surf fishing
Scalloped Hammerhead juvenile .. photo Dennis Shupp

In the late summer a lot of these juvenile scalloped hammerheads are caught in the surf and surrounding waters.  Boaters will see them swimming just below the surface of the water   The sharks come into the surf areas to pup.  A few years ago a hammerhead was in t he surf in Ocean City and people were freaking out.  This is normal, they are pupping or having their baby sharks.  

The scalloped hammerhead is called that because of the notches along its “hammer”.   They are active predators, that gain advantages with the shape of their head.  Widely spaced eyes, and nostrils with other senses allow them to locate prey along the sea floor, they can even detect prey that is buried.  

scalloped hammerhead juvenile, delaware, sussex county, surf fishing
Scalloped Hammerhead juvenile .. photo Dennis Shupp

The hammer is used to pin rays on the sea floor to make eating them easier.  All sharks have the ability to sense the electric field given off by other fish, with special sensory cells.  This ability may be more of an advantage in hammerheads with that wide head.  Helping them locate buried prey on the seafloor.   

There are specific rules for sharks in the state of Delaware and federal regulations.  Know these before you keep or retain any shark.  These juvenile sharks and any other shark under the length of 54 inches is to be released immediately.  They are not to be retained at all.  Taking  a picture posing with one is considered possession according to DNREC.

Delaware Creel limit   78 inches fork length 
Season   Jan 1st to  May 14th   and  July 16th to Dec 31st 

 

 

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